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Publishing Pulse: January 11, 2013

Success Stories

Congratulations to our latest success stories, Nikki Stuckwisch, Laura Tims, and Suzanne van Rooyen! Click their names to read their attention-getting queries and to learn about how they landed their agents.

Downtime for Upgrade

The main QueryTracker site will be down for a few hours on Saturday evening for upgrades!

Around the Internet

Did you know that Facebook tracks negative feedback on your posts and makes them show up for fewer people? Find out how and what you can do about it.

Fellow blogger Sarah Pinneo wrote about why she uses Scrivener, and I wrote about why I use yWriter. This week another of our QTBloggers, Stina Lindenblatt, likes SmartEdit. Check out her review over on her personal blog.

Ever think about what the movie for your novel would be like? (Of course you have. You probably know just who you'd cast for each character!) Over on Novel Rocket, novelist and screenwriter talks about adapting your novel into a screenplay.

To reach your goals, you may need to set boundaries, or limits, by looking at the opposite of each of your goals. Lydia Sharp shows you how on Write It Sideways.

Staying optimistic about your chances of success as a writer can be pretty tough, but agent Rachelle Gardner  shows you how to rewrite doom-and-gloom thinking.

Have a great weekend and we'll see you next week!


Carolyn Kaufman, PsyD's book, THE WRITER'S GUIDE TO PSYCHOLOGY: How to Write Accurately About Psychological Disorders, Clinical Treatment, and Human Behavior helps writers avoid common misconceptions and inaccuracies and "get the psych right" in their stories. You can learn more about The Writer's Guide to Psychology, check out Dr. K's blog on Psychology Today, or follow her on Facebook
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1 comments:

On January 11, 2013 at 9:45 AM , Wendy said...

Thanks for the post, Carolyn. New to Facebook, I found the link about it especially fascinating. It appears that generating vibrant discussions, that would necessarily involve some pro and con feedback, is a bad thing. Interesting.